CLAUDE WILLEY

DEENA CAPPARELLI

ADAM BELT

BERNARD PERROUD

KAHTY CHENOWETH

S.E. Barnet

MARK Tsang

 

 

CLAUDE WILLEY

DEENA CAPPARELLI

ADAM BELT

BERNARD PERROUD

KAHTY CHENOWETH

S.E. Barnet

MARK Tsang

I often think about the stretch along US Interstate 15 extending out as one uninterrupted conurbation. Vegas and Los Angeles as connected nuclei in a sprawling mess. The Mojave, no longer our borderland to the east, will become the new megashape of the American Southwest. At present, our Eastern desert is the frontier for experimentation and urban growth. A shrinking void being filled in by human patterns. How will the future desert homesteaders interface with the liquid world in a land so dry? Will future Californians focus on survival or opulence?

 

The gravitation towards water has been strong all of my life. Maybe it is the fact that I was born and raised in Southern California and experienced drought on a number of occasions. Or it was the ongoing journey to find relief in the hot summer and fall months in the swimming holes in Cucamonga Canyon, Ice House Canyon, Day Canyon, the pools of friends, neighbors, and occasionally my house where my parents transformed a trout pond into a pool during the summer months. I used to plan my walks around times sprinklers would be cooling off the grassy front yards in my neighborhood. Later my hiking and mountaineering adventures always culminated to bodies of water. The idea of collecting, storing and distributing water in the desert appeals to the side of myself that enjoys the search for cooling relief in extreme arid regions.

 

Aside from monsoons and flash floods the presence of moisture in the desert is revealed through the physical remnants of water's passage. As such this opportunity has proven to be inherently fascinating. I am thrilled to participate in this project which continues to insight and foster discussion, discovery and wonder.

" Once I asked a Papago youngster what the desert smelled like to him. He answered with little hesitation: 'The desert smells like rain.' " The Desert Smells Like Rain.
-- Gary Paul Nabhan.

 

The desert.
The desert, the Sahara, the Sonora, the Mojave have given me some of my fondest memories.
The desert, like the palm of my hand, seems empty but is full of latent possibilities.
The desert, land of wild dreams.
In the desert water reveals it's true significance: the source of life on earth.
To make water appear in the desert is magic.

 

I enjoy the dynamic of Moisture ... It is an intangible set of relationships and ideas that ebbs and flows ... It is the conceptual equivalent of the water we seek. I participate in Moisture because it satisfies my love of experimentation, dialogue and experiential forms of art practice; as well as my curiosity and delight in interacting with natural phenomena in particular geologic environments.

 

My environment changed drastically when my family moved from Seattle, Washington to Phoenix, Arizona. I became acutely sensitized to the specifics of living in a desert and to how that engenders a hyper awareness of water. I am always impressed by the crucial nature of water flow in determining place and home.

The first phase of Moisture was a great experience for me. I entered the whole thing with a single intention, documentation. Being involved with something on this scale was a new experience for me. The benefit of the project was being able to have the site influence my own ideas as I was documenting the the project and the area. I have always considered being involved a great honor.