A BLOG FOR THE MOISTURE PROJECT, 2002-?

Monday, December 20, 2004

NOTES FROM 12/18/04

On Sunday, December 18th, Deena and I trekked out to the MOISTURE main site, leaving Rancho Cucamonga around 8:30am. We drove directly to Hinkley, stopping off to take some photos of the town for Jeppe in Denmark, arriving at the CLUI Desert Research Station around 9:45am. (Over the past week the folks from CLUI have been fixing things up and preparing for the planting of several native trees. Deena has been helping them in the selection process, and giving them irrigation advice.) At the DRS, I filled our 7 water containers while Deena watered some of the recently planted trees. Lambchop and Zoe, the two non-human passengers, ran around the property re-acclimating themselves to the site of phase one. We soon found ourselves back on the road and headed to the main site.

We arrived at the site around 11:00a.m., and Deena showed me the tire tracks near the gardens. Obviously visitors had been to the site, but they were respectful of the experiments. No damage to be noted.



After unloaded all of the water, and bringing it down to the site, Deena moved around the gardens and hand-watered some of the shrubs in great need of moisture.




Deena had been at the site earlier in the week, but I was surprised to see how green everything was.



Deena used up the water from the containers within the hour, and I returned in the Jeep to the DRS. I refueled and returned. While away, Deena had dug the holes for the two 5-gallon Cercidium Floridum trees and another for the Prosopis Pubescens. She had also cut out 3 root cages for the trees.

As Deena prepared the trees for their new home, I worked in Garden #6 installing a new supply of DriWater for the Baccharis Sarothroides. I used almost an entire case. We were last out in mid-November and it appears that the rate at which the DriWater is used during the winter months is nothing like it is used during the summer. I found little animal damage at this time.

Deena laid in the root cages and positioned the plants and sleeves. I put the DriWater capsules into old cartons and then placed them into the awaiting sleeves. We finished with the Cercidium Floridums and the Prosopis Pubescens and then completed the process by placing the fencing around them. Everything looked very secure.






I then moved into Garden #2 and checked the DriWater cartons installed one month ago.
Everything looked good. We used the last of the water on the Yucca Whipplei who are looking quite well. It seems as if they’ve been doing well with the recent rains.




With the sun coming down quickly we gathered up our gear and packed the Jeep. We took the back route to Victorville to avoid the Vegas traffic and wound up hitting a dog running full speed across the road. A bad experience indeed.

In Altadena, Deena is still growing the MOISTURE-destined trees. Accaii Smalli, Accaii Greggi, and Cercidium Floridum continue to grow in the Seed Prop units. 2-3 years before we bring them out. At the DRS await 5 Atriplex Canesen. 4 of them will return to Altadena to grow bigger, and one will be planted on the MOISTURE site. Thanks to Matt Coolidge, from the CLUI, who gave us all of the plants put in the ground during this trip.



Until next time!

--Claude
The following photos are from the trip out to Sites for Flood and Drought with Jacob Melchi on November 30th,
I recieved the transmitters from Lotech in Canada. They emit a Sputnik type blip using a simple RF signal. I can now go out with any radio frequency receiver and pick up their signal.


SE

movement! 


site#2point
Originally uploaded by sebarnet.
Rebecca is pointing to the spot the sphere originally was

site#2 


site#2wide2
Originally uploaded by sebarnet.
Have been out to Sites for Flood and Drought twice this fall. First, with Rebecca McGrew on October 28th. There had been some rain earlier than normal for this time of year so I was eager to see the results.
Site #1 was about about the same, at that site it actually looks like the sand is building up around the spheres and creating small mounds - almost like anthills.
At Site #3 spheres are slowly becoming more and more exposed but the exciting news is at Site #2 where one of the spheres is COMPLETELY EXPOSED!
SE Barnet

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?